New Review: “Biomolecular condensates: organizers of cellular biochemistry”

Congratulations to our postdoc Kate Lee, Tony, and co-authors Salman Banani and Mike Rosen of UTSW on their new review, “Biomolecular condensates: organizers of cellular biochemistry.” Read the full article using the links below.

Biomolecular condensates: organizers of cellular biochemistry. [PDF]
Banani SF, Lee HO, Hyman AA, Rosen MK.
Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol. 2017 Feb 22.

Biomolecular condensates are micron-scale compartments in eukaryotic cells that lack surrounding membranes but function to concentrate proteins and nucleic acids. These condensates are involved in diverse processes, including RNA metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, the DNA damage response and signal transduction. Recent studies have shown that liquid–liquid phase separation driven by multivalent macromolecular interactions is an important organizing principle for biomolecular condensates. With this physical framework, it is now possible to explain how the assembly, composition, physical properties and biochemical and cellular functions of these important structures are regulated.

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